Additional Math Pages & Resources

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Excel Math: Powerful in a Core or Supplement Position


Excel Math builds student success when used in either a core or supplement position.

The Excel Math Common Core Teacher Editions contain lessons, discussion ideas, hands-on activities, teaching tips, and manipulatives that guide educators as they transistion to the new Common Core Standards.

In a recent EdSource post, Lillian Mongeau got right to this point, saying teachers are "unevenly prepared" to teach in this "dramatically different fashion."

Here's where the new Excel Math Common Core Teacher Editions can help.

Instead of leaving it up to the teacher to figure out new ways to teach, the new Excel Math Common Core Editions contain lessons, discussion ideas, hands-on activities, teaching tips, and manipulatives (such as fractions on a number line and coordinate grids) that address the new Common Core Standards.

Excel Math gives teachers powerful lessons in either a core or a supplement position. Our unique spiraling process gives students the foundation they need to build a foundation of math skills.

Using Excel Math as a Supplement?

Here are a few points to remember:

1. Stick with Excel Math's Daily Pacing
There's no need to skip around with Excel Math. Follow the lessons as they occur in the Student Lesson Sheets and in the Common Core Teacher Edition. Because Excel Math Lessons use a precise spiraling process, the concepts will occur taught in the lesson will reoccur at regular intervals for practice, review, homework and assessment. We don't expect mastery the first time the concept is introduced.



Using Excel Math:
Core Program Connection [9:00 min]


2. Go with the Core
It doesn't matter if your Core curriculum has you teaching a different concept than appears on the Excel Math Lesson Sheets. The Excel Math spiraling process has you covered! The spaced repetition of Common Core concepts ensures that your students will continue to have exposure to the concepts introduced in your Core curriculum.

Schools report that test scores increase after using Excel Math as a supplement to their Core curriculum. Read math success stories and rave reviews from administrators, teachers and parents on the successes page of our website.

Read more about using Excel Math as a supplement . . . 

You might also like these articles:
Math Poems, Songs and Games
Common Core—A New View On Learning Math
Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten
March Math

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Paul Revere's Ride April 18

April 18 marks the 239th anniversary of Paul Revere's ride. Let your students celebrate the occasion with a poetry reading; red, white and blue snacks; colonial games and a brief history lesson.

On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere and several other American patriots rode through the countryside of New England to warn the colonists of the arrival of British troops.

Paul Revere was an American silversmith, engraver and early industrialist. For a fascinating look at his life and colonial times in 1775, the book Paul Revere and the World He Lived In by Esther Hoskins Forbes is an interesting read: "not merely one man riding one horse on a certain lonely night of long ago, but a symbol to which his countrymen can yet turn."

Paul Revere was a dentist as well as a silversmith. Here are 12 interesting facts about Paul Revere your students may not know from www.history.com.

Since April is also National Poetry Month, you could have your students read "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere," the well-known poem by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Then have your students listen to this reading of the poem complete with historic paintings and the sound of galloping horses.

Read more . . . 

You might also like these articles:
Math Poems, Songs and Games
Common Core—A New View On Learning Math
Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten
March Math


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Math Poems, Songs and Games

April is National Poetry Month!

Take a look at the celebrations and community events happening around the country. The Academy of American Poets has put together a list of 30 ways to celebrate. Here are a few:
  • Attend a poetry reading.
  • Memorize a poem.
  • Recite a poem to family or friends.
  • Write a poem in chalk on your sidewalk.
  • Hang poems from a tree in your schoolyard or neighborhood park.
  • Sign up to receive a poem a day emailed to your inbox.
  • Give students a list of words and ask them to create a poem using words from that list. (Include a few mathematical words and phrases.)
    Read more suggestions for celebrating National Poetry Month at http://www.poets.org

    You can incorporate poems, rhymes and songs into your math class, too. Ten Green & Speckled Frogs is a fun way to teach subtraction, one more, one less and base ten concepts.

    Give each student a copy of the poem and let them cut out the ten frogs. Then give them a ten frame and have them place one frog on each space. Ask how many frogs they have. (10)

    Say the first verse of the song together (or sing it) and have the students remove one frog from the ten frame. Write on the board:
    10 - 1 =
    Ask the students to find the answer by looking at their ten frame. (9)

    Explain that they can check the answer with addition:
    9 + 1 = 10
    Say the second verse of the song together (or sing it) and have the students remove one more frog from the ten frame. Write the corresponding equation and check it with addition. Continue in this way until there are no more frogs on the ten frame.

    Read more . . . 

    You might also like these articles:
    Common Core—A New View On Learning Math
    Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten
    March Math
    Common Core Buzzwords and Excel Math

    How do you celebrate National Poetry Month with your students? Click on the word "comments" below to share your ideas.

    Tuesday, April 8, 2014

    Common Core—A New View on Learning Math


    Across the country, Common Core State frameworks, teacher toolkits and unit lesson suggestions are being rolled out and updated to help educators get on board with the new standards.

    A draft of the California math curriculum framework went online recently for public comments and suggestions.

    Even as teachers are beginning to receive some guidance for teaching to the Common Core, the training and preparation they are receiving has been sporadic at best.

    In a recent EdSource post, Lillian Mongeau got right to this point, saying teachers are "unevenly prepared" to teach in this "dramatically different fashion." With the new standards, "Rather than providing a formula to calculate the area of a shape, students might be given a set of problems or activities that help them discover how to arrive at the formula on their own." A teacher friend told it's tough designing problems that allow students to figure out the tricks—something she's never really had to do before." http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2014/03/with_common_core_early_math_te.html

    Here's where the new Excel Math Common Core Teacher Editions can help. Instead of leaving it up to the teacher to figure out, these new editions contain lessons, discussion ideas, hands-on activities, teaching tips, and manipulatives (such as fractions on a number line and coordinate grids) that address the new Common Core Standards. 

    Not only does each CCS Teacher Edition include new teaching tools, it also walks teachers through the new discovery methods of teaching math, no longer just having students memorize algorithms.

    Mathematical Practices, another new component of the CCS Standards, are woven Excel Math lessons at each grade level.

    Read more . . . 

    You might also like these articles:
    Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten
    March Math
    Common Core Buzzwords and Excel Math


    Feel free to leave a Comment in the box below. We love hearing from teachers, administrators and parents from around the country.

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

    8 Steps to Teaching Mathematical Practices

    With the transition to Common Core across the country and the newly revised TEKS confronting Texas schools, educators are placing a greater emphasis on mathematical processes. Teachers are spending more time letting students discover concepts for themselves while teaching students how to put math skills into practice in everyday life.

    It's no longer enough for students to simply learn algorithms. Now they must be able to explain how they arrived at their solution and then relate the math skills to real-world problem solving.

    Students are now taught to analyze mathematical relationships and connect and communicate mathematical ideas. Students are expected to display, explain, or justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written as well as oral communication.


    Excel Math weaves together mathematical knowledge and skills
    The Texas Mathematical Process Standards weave together mathematical knowledge and skills so students grow to be successful problem solvers and use mathematics efficiently and effectively in daily life.

    Excel Math Mathematical Practices
    We've highlighted 8 steps to teaching mathematical practices by grade level. These include examples of how we've woven these Practices into the tasks and activities your students will complete throughout the year when using Excel Math. To get concepts into long-term memory, students must now begin to actively discover, interpret, analyze, process, practice, discuss and communicate about math.

    Here's just one step to teaching mathematical processes from Grade 3:
    Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others: In third grade, mathematically proficient students construct arguments using concrete references such as objects, pictures and drawings. They justify their conclusions as they participate in discussions that the teacher facilitates by asking questions such as "How did you get that?" and "Why is that true?" Third grade students use symbols, diagrams, graphs, number lines and mathematical language. They explain their thinking, construct arguments and respond to the thinking of others.

    Download a separate grade level document addressing Mathematical Practices for Kindergarten through Grade 6 on the Excel Math website: http://www.excelmath.com/downloads/state_stds.html

    Read more . . . 

    You might also like these articles:
    Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten
    March Math
    Common Core Buzzwords and Excel Math
    Celebrate Digital Learning Day with Excel Math
    Pi Day in the Math Classroom

    Wednesday, March 19, 2014

    Top-Notch Math Lessons for Transitional Kindergarten

    http://excelmath.com/downloads/state_stds.html
    What is Transitional Kindergarten?

    According to the California Education Code, transitional Kindergarten is defined as “the first year of a two-year kindergarten program that uses a modified kindergarten curriculum that is age and developmentally appropriate.” Traditional kindergarten, in contrast, is a one-year program with grade-specific curriculum.

    In some states, Transitional Kindergarten gives children an opportunity to begin Kindergarten, even if they are not yet old enough for Traditional kindergarten. These students are usually five years old, but their birthdays fall before the age entry cut-off.

    So Transitional Kindergarten is not designed to be a preschool program. Instead, it provides students with year one of a two-year kindergarten program.

    Excel Math Kindergarten Common Core lessons are ideal for a Transitional Kindergarten classroom. Here are just a few of the reasons these lessons work so well for young students:

    Common Core Lessons
    http://excelmath.com/downloads/state_stds.htmlThe lessons are age appropriate and sequential and focus on the Common Core State Standards. The unique spiraling process means students are not expected to master concepts the first time they are introduced. Rather, concepts spiral back into Guided Practice and Homework before they appear on assessments.

    Read more . . . 

    You might also like these articles:
    St. Patrick's Day Math
    Common Core Buzzwords and Excel Math
    Celebrate Digital Learning Day with Excel Math
    Pi Day in the Math Classroom