Additional Math Pages & Resources

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Excel Math: Your Common Core Solution


It's been five years since California adopted the Common Core State Standards for mathematics and English language arts.

During that time, the search for high-quality textbooks and curriculum materials has been a sticking point, in some cases a major one, in effectively and speedily implementing the new standards.

That’s according to leaders in several school districts where EdSource is tracking Common Core implementation. Read more from EdSource.org.

School districts are making progress in finding and selecting the right materials, but the complicated effort has stymied many districts across California and around the country.

The task of finding a good curriculum for teaching elementary math does not need to be this complex!

The good news is that Excel Math Common Core Editions help give students a strong foundation in math and prepares students for Common Core testing as well as for district and classroom assessments.

Excel Math is a proven way to get students interested in learning math and progressing in their math abilities.

Excel Math lessons prepare students for real-world problem solving. With it's uniquely detailed spiraling process, Excel Math helps students build success in math and actually retain concepts for the long term. What a concept!

Download our "Successful Strategies for Implementing Excel Math Mid Year" for step-by-step guidelines to begin teaching with Excel Math today. There's no need to wait for summer or fall.

Students can begin preparing for spring testing now.

And you can expect to watch test scores rise when Excel Math is used in either a core or supplement position to complement your existing core math program.

Ring in the New Year with these steps to building student success with math.

Then give us a call to schedule your Professional Development sessions with Bob or Becky. Read more about Excel Math PD for our Standard, Common Core and Texas Editions.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Periodic Update: An Elemental Milestone


Memorizing the Periodic Table just got even harder.
On December 30, 2015 the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, a scientific nongovernmental body, formally announced that four new elements will be added to the periodic table, rounding out the seventh row of this well-known chart.

The new elements are all classified as "super-heavy" radioactive substances, meaning they have more than 104 protons. They were created using particle accelerators and, like other super-heavy elements, exist for only a brief moment—as little as a fraction of a second—before decaying.

Periodic Table with Temporary Names for New Elements
The elements are known by temporary names based on the number of protons each contains in its nucleus: ununtrium (element 113), ununpentium (115), ununseptium (117), and ununoctium (118). According to the Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), "the discoverers from Japan, Russia and the U.S.A. will now be invited to suggest permanent names and symbols."

New elements can be "named after a mythological concept, a mineral, a place or country, a property or a scientist," according to the IUPAC. The proposed names and symbols will be checked by the Inorganic Chemistry Division of IUPAC for consistency, translatability into other languages, possible prior historic use for other cases, etc. 
Then the names and two-letter symbols will be presented for public review for five months, before the highest body of IUPAC, the Council, will make a final decision on the names of these new chemical elements and their two-letter symbols and their introduction into the Periodic Table of the Elements.
Copernicus
This is the first time elements have been added to the table since 2011, reports the Wall Street Journal. The most recent addition to the periodic table was Element 112, formally named copernicium to honor Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus.

Three of the elements—designated with atomic numbers of 115, 117 and 118—were first detected more than a decade ago by researchers at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Russia and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. The fourth, with an atomic number of 113, was discovered in 2004 by the Riken research institute in Japan, making it the first element to have been discovered in Asia. Kosuke Morita, who led the research, said his team searched for more than seven years for data to identify the element.


"We just never saw another event," he said. "I was not prepared to give up, however, as I believed that one day, if we persevered, luck would fall upon us again."

And so it did on August 12, 2012, when the group observed the crucial third event. Former Riken president and Nobel Laureate in chemistry Ryoji Noyori told the Guardian: "To scientists, this is of greater value than an Olympic gold medal".

"The chemistry community is eager to see its most cherished table finally being completed down to the seventh row. IUPAC has now initiated the process of formalizing names and symbols for these elements " said Professor Jan Reedijk, the President of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of IUPAC.

Unfortunately, as science teachers know, textbooks often don't keep up with the times. So it could be quite a few years before students see that completed seventh row in their chemistry textbooks.
That's what makes Excel Math so great. Lessons are updated throughout the year so you never have to worry about whether you have the latest materials. Take a look at sample Excel Math lessons for Kindergarten through Sixth grade on our website: www.excelmath.com

Ready to place an order? Visit our web store: https://excelmath.myshopify.com/

You may also enjoy these articles:



Higher Order Word Problems for Math Students

Financial Awareness for Students
  
Calming the Frenzy Over Fractions

Monday, November 16, 2015

Visit Excel Math in San Antonio for the AIE Conference

The 2015 AIE Conference will be held in San Antonio, Texas from November 16 - 18.

Bob and Brad will be there with the new Excel Math Texas Editions!

Stop by Booth #18 to take a look at our Texas Teacher Editions for Kindergarten through Grade 6. Be sure to ask about taking home an Excel Math executive pen.

Sign up for our occasional tips and printables while you're there (or visit this link on our website: Free Tips and Printables)

http://excelmath.com/downloads/state_stdsTX.html

TEKS aligned and STAAR ready, these Excel Math Texas Teacher Editions include new TEKS objectives plus:
  • discussion suggestions 
  • new teaching ideas and hands-on activities
  • quarterly test tables with the TEKS concept listed for each test question
  • new manipulatives and reproducible patterns 
  • various problem-solving techniques explained
  • added rigor and 
  • more emphasis on those TEKS concepts new to students in each grade level.
Excel Math Texas Teacher Editions—TEKS aligned, STAAR ready

Excel Math Grade 1 Texas Teacher Edition
With our new Texas Teacher Editions, Excel Math is now current with the new Texas Math TEKS. We do not have a personal financial literacy component, but we have built into the lessons lots of practice with coins, money, making change, calculating interest, budgeting, etc.

Our Grades 2 - 6 Texas Teacher Editions include a reproducible Budget Worksheet to help students develop a system for keeping and using financial records and to learn to balance a budget when expenses exceed income.

Take a look at the new Texas grade level correlations and sample lessons for Kindergarten through Grade 6.

Click on the colorful sample bars on the web page to choose your grade level(s). Scroll down the web page to see the correlations and click on the round buttons: http://excelmath.com/downloads/state_stdsTX.html

Within each grade level, we correlate the Excel Math Lessons, Stretches, Activities and Exercises to each Texas standard. You can see correlations by lesson number at the end of each correlation document.

Reserve your cost-effective 
Professional Development seminar today

Our vice-president Bob would be glad to provide you and your colleagues with a couple of hours of inservice training with Excel Math (at minimal cost to cover travel expenses), once you start using the program. One of his seminars specifically addresses best practices for Teaching to the new TEKS using Excel Math.

Additionally the in-service includes how to effectively blend Excel Math with an adopted core curriculum for maximum instruction. Feel free to call Bob, visit him in the booth or send him an email: bob@excelmath.com.

You can find more information about Bob's presentations on our website: Texas PD

You may also enjoy these articles:



Higher Order Word Problems for Math Students

Financial Awareness for Students
 
Calming the Frenzy Over Fractions
November 16-18, 2015 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in downtown San Antonio, Texas - See more at: http://www.aieconference.net/index.html#sthash.cNkaPJ6G.dpuf
November 16-18, 2015 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in downtown San Antonio, Texas - See more at: http://www.aieconference.net/index.html#sthash.cNkaPJ6G.dpuf

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Odd Day in the Math Classroom

Odd day is a day that singles out those wonderful, wacky odd numbers. It occurs when three consecutive odd numbers make up a date — something that happens only six times in a century.

The last Odd Day was 09/11/13 and this year it will occur on 11/13/15. Can you guess when the next one will take place? (Not until 1/03/2105.)

Celebrate the day by doing odd things in your classroom.

You may want to let your students do odd numbered problems on this day, count off by 3s, wear odd outfits, have a crazy/odd hair day, recite an odd poem or quote some odd trivia.

Your students could play Dominoes or Go Fish or Mancala (board games or computer games) but count up only the odd numbers left at the end.

Or let the students play board games where players can only move when the dice shows (or totals) an odd number.

Try a few odd math facts, skip-count by odd numbers, etc.

Then let your students figure out when the previous four Odd Days occurred (3/5/2007, 5/7/2009, 7/9/2011, 9/11/2013) and when they can expect to see the next four Odd Days. (1/3/2105, 3/5/2107, 5/7/2109 and 7/9/2111)

Excel Math lessons teach students how to recognize odd and even numbers, learn foundational math concepts, and retain those concepts for the long term. Excel Math can even help students develop a love for math.

For over 40 years, these proven math lessons have developed higher-order thinking skills, built proficiency, and continue to produce confidence in students of all ages and abilities.  

Excel Math was written to give teachers the tools they need to help students develop a strong foundation in math. Read more about Excel Math and its systematic spiraling process at www.excelmath.com.

New to Excel Math? Preview elementary math lessons that really work for Kindergarten through Sixth Grade on our website: www.excelmath.com.

Download sample lessons from our K - 6 Grades Common Core Teacher Editions by visiting our website.

How will you celebrate odd day with your students? Leave a comment by clicking on the word "comments" below.

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Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Orchestrating the Common Core Classroom

Visit Excel Math at the CMC South Conference in Palm Springs November 5-7, 2015.

This year the 2015 CMC Convention will be held in South Palm Springs at the Palm Springs Convention Center. Bob and Brad will be there.

The 56th Annual California Mathematics Council is focusing on the theme:

Orchestrating the Common Core Classroom

Stop by Booth #240 and see our proven  Excel Math lessons and  Common Core Teacher Editions for Kindergarten through Grade 6. Pick up a sample packet and some chocolate while you're there!
The exhibit hall for CMC opens at 8:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday in Oasis II and III of the Palm Springs Convention Center.

Visit Excel Math at CMC
You can join Bob and Brad to take a look at our Common Core Teacher Editions for Kindergarten through Grade 6 and take home an Excel Math executive pen.

Download our Excel Math grade level correlations to the Common Core Standards and view sample lessons for Kindergarten through Grade 6.

Click on the colorful sample bars on the web page to choose your grade level(s). Scroll down the web page to see the correlations and click on the round buttons: CCS Correlations

Within each grade level, we correlate the Excel Math Lessons, Stretches, Activities and Exercises to each CCSS standard.

You can see correlations by lesson number at the end of each correlation document.


Reserve your cost-effective 
Professional Development seminar today

Excel Math Professional Development
Our vice-president Bob would be glad to provide you and your colleagues with a couple of hours of inservice training with Excel Math (at minimal cost to cover travel expenses), once you start using the program.

One of Bob's seminars specifically addresses best practices for teaching to the Common Core Standards using Excel Math.

Excel Math CCS Teacher Edition
Additionally the in-service includes how to effectively blend Excel Math with an adopted core curriculum for maximum instruction.

Feel free to call Bob, visit him in the booth or send him an email: bob@excelmath.com.

You can find more information about Bob's engaging presentations on our website: Professional Development

For more information and to register for the CMC conference visit: http://www.cmc-south.org/conference-info-2015.html

You may also enjoy these articles:

Higher Order Word Problems for Math Students

Using Number Lines in the Math Class

Financial Awareness for Students
 
Calming the Frenzy Over Fractions

Excel Math Helps Students Raise Test Scores

Monday, October 26, 2015

Excel Math Badges for Your Classroom


Student Badges Chart - Click to Download
We've created some colorful Excel Math digital badges (and printable stickers) for you to give your students as they complete their lessons and tests.

Digital badges and printable templates for Homework, Tests and Lessons are included to get you started.

You can feel free to edit them with your school name, write in the Lesson or Test number or let your students sign their names. Let's get creative with custom badges!
Printable Excel Math Badges

Download our Student Badges Chart if you use the printable badges. Copy one chart for each student.

These can go on the wall (using student ID numbers) or may be kept in the child's binder.

If you prefer a digital chart, download the PDF chart file and import it into Google Drive. Open it in Google Docs and share it with each student.

We get you started with Excel Math digital badges for each lesson, test and homework assignment.

Give each student a Homework badge when they bring back completed homework, showing their work.

TIP: If you drag the badge image into the Student Badges chart (or place it as an image), the badge will automatically be sized to fit the size of the cell in the chart. So you don't have to worry about resizing the badges to fit the chart.

We also give you a set of Test badges you can award when your students finish each test or achieve a certain test score—your choice.

If you haven't gone digital yet, simply print out the badges and let your students glue them to their papers or onto a chart you provide in the classroom.

You can also print the badges onto sticker paper (Avery #6540) so they can simply peel and stick them onto the chart.

We've even included a link to walk you through the steps to create more badges yourself.

This video from Alice Keeler will show you how it's done, one step at a time. You can have a whole library of digital badges for your students in no time!

If your students enjoy getting the badges, let them create some badges of their own. They can use Google Drive themselves to design their badges.

Or print a blank template and students can color their own badges, cut them out, give them back to you in an envelope, and you can hand them out as your students complete each lesson, homework assignment, or test.

Have fun with badges!

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